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DIY Transmission Repair - Part 2 - Splitting The Case
Topic Started: Mar 21 2009, 02:04 PM (31,481 Views)
pacapo
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Toward the bottom of this thread are instructions if you are unable to view the pictures. This pictorial is easily viewed via Google Chrome using those instructions.
You will find the necessary steps to take your transmission apart to a level allowing you to repair it or replace the complete input and counter rotating shafts from another transmission.
The entire sequence requires about 25 minutes labor once you put the transaxle on the bench - maybe more if it is your first time.
There are no special tools required, but the ones mentioned do make the process easier.
If you have someone to help you, it should be easy for you to 'split the case' and have the three shafts in hand in a half hour.
Do not be afraid of the detail. Once you've done it, you'll kick yourself because it really is easy.
Indeed, few mechanics can do what is included in this simple thread.
Transmission repair certainly separates the boys from the men.
Thanks to the Administrator/Moderators who prevented it from getting buried in the transmission section by giving it 'sticky' status.
You will find that the threads I mention below, which address the next steps in repairing the transmission: stripping the shafts of gears, replacing them etc. no longer have pictures, or the links don't work at all.
At the time of original posting, all the links mentioned had working pictures.
Thanks to the members who have added helpful information to the thread.
Thanks to Dattman who knows this stuff backwards and forwards.
Many transmissions have been repaired using only the steps mentioned here.
Originally, I was going to make threads on how to rebuild the shafts as well, but felt there was no need as others had done so and their threads were clear.
(Edited to thank the Administration/Moderation for pinning this link on 4/25/18.)

First you must remove your transmission using Johnny Mullet's thread:
http://geometroforum.com/topic/638772/1/
"Manual Trans Removal /Clutch Guide; How to remove the transmission"
or get a loose transaxle from somewhere (junkyard, for example).
Then you can pull it apart to see what's wrong, if anything.
Second you learn how to take your transmission apart...down to the basic shaft assemblies.
Once you have completed these 25 basic steps (roughly 90 minutes for a first-timer) you should go to the next part:
Third - you inspect and repair the gears on the shafts as needed.
Originally, I directed the GeoMetroForum membership to this thread:
http://geometroforum.com/topic/4170394/3/
Which gave a picture heavy "how to take apart the two shafts and reassemble your transmission".
(Unfortunately- this "Hold on to your lug nuts" link has had the pictures removed by the author, so it is no longer helpful. Plus, at 11 pages, it is very long, and I believe he made some critical mistakes as the transmission didn't last long.)
As of this editing, my recommendation is:
The Factory Service Manual would be your best resource as of the date of this edit to help in rebuilding the input and counter rotating shafts.
Fourth, you reverse the sequence in this thread to put your transaxle back together.
Fifth, you install the transaxle into the car and hopefully drive off in the sunset a happy camper!
Originally posted on TeamSwift.net by Phil N Ed AKA pacapo a long time ago in Bethlehem hahaha:
Quote:
 

Here's how to split your transmission case:

We begin using the earlier 'MK1' transmission (Not the later Metro black box style, however those instructions are included below).

Drain and Remove Transaxle.
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1. Remove backup lamp switch.
2. Remove (7) bolts from the side case (#2 above) and remove side case.
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3. Remove snap ring and hub plate
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4. Remove shift fork screw and guide ball
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5. With the transmission in neutral, remove the roll pin
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6. Push in on gear shift shaft
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...slide synchronizer sleeve toward center of trans (see arrow) to engage 5th gear
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...another view
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...unstake and remove 5th gear retainer
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7. Remove everything in the brackets as a unit. #2 is showing what you want to avoid...
8. Remove 5th gear (drive) from the input shaft
9. Remove 5th gear (driven) from the countershaft
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10. Remove 7 screws on retainer plate. Mark or tag spacer shims if present.
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11. Remove 3 bolts on left case cap and remove cap.
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12. Remove the roll pin using the correct diameter drift/punch
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13. Install a drift into the roll pin hole and raise the shaft for removal of the yoke and roll pin.
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14. Remove the bolt retaining the reverse spring and detent ball. Remove the spring and ball.
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15. Remove the locating bolt for the gear hift/selector shaft.
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16. Remove the 4 bolts of the gear shift guide case (#3 above)
17. Remove the gear shift/selector shaft assembly along with the low speed select spring (#1 above).
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18. Remove the 3 bolts retaining the detent balls and springs as shown. Also remove the springs.
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19. Remove 13 bolts which hold the two casings together. Here, two are left.
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20. Insert a large flat screwdriver between the two casings as shown, and in three or 4 other locations.
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21. Lift the left case straight up. All parts whill remain on the lower case as shown.
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22. Raise 5th (#1 above) and reverse (#2 above)
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...to give clearance for removal of the reverse gear and shaft
23. Remove 2 bolts retaining reverse idler shift lever to the case; remove lever.
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24. Remove 5th and reverse gear shift shafts together (as an assembly).
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25. Remove remaining input and countershafts as well as the two shift shafts (everything in the white bracket) as an assembly (together).

That is the Factory recommended sequence. We simply added some real world photos to supplement your Factory Manual line drawings.

For a Metro transmission, check and see if you have the black side case (Black Box Tranny).
Here's one from 4 different angles:
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Here's one.
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another view
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If you have that transmission here are a couple of differences:
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#1. The reverse switch.
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#2. The black cover has 6 bolts vs. 7 on an older style transmission. Two require a 12mm wrench.
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The black box also has the oil filler plug in a different location.
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Here are the two covers. The black has a more developed oiler for the input shaft.(not clearly visible in the photo)
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#4. Remove shift fork screw and guide ball: the screw is now removed via hex wrench:
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#6."...unstake and remove 5th gear retainer" The retainer is now larger(I think it's a 28 MM socket):
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so you will have to use a 1 inch socket or hand wrench (or MM equivalent).
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10. "Remove 7 screws on retainer plate. Mark or tag spacer shims if present." It is now 6 phillips screws. A "hand impact tool set" is highly recommended. There are no spacers due to a change in the input shaft bearings: they are no longer tapered roller bearings. The countershaft retains tapered roller bearings in a cage at each end.

12. "Remove the roll pin using the correct diameter drift/punch" Is now changed to "remove bolt..."

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14. "Remove the bolt retaining the reverse spring and detent ball." Location of reverse bolt is as shown above. There is no spring or ball.


18. "Remove the 3 bolts retaining the detent balls and springs as shown. Also remove the springs."
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You will note the two different size springs used to hold the balls against the shafts. The earlier models use one size only. Some suggest you do this step later so that the shafts and gears will remain in the right housing.

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19. "Remove 13 bolts which hold the two casings together." The two bolts shown above are the only two accessed from inside the bell housing. Removing these at the start of disassembly might save you a few seconds.
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The left case is very light. The black box trans has two points where you can safely pry the cases apart.

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#22. Reverse can be removed without raising 5th gear.

Special Tools:

Impact hand held screwdriver (highly recommended-you can see it in use in #10 above)


Other Tools/Help:
Snap ring pliers
Drift/Punch/Allen wrench to drive out pin
Several Plastic 'Sandwich Bags'
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to keep the different bolts, nuts, pins, etc. organized.

Reverse this procedure, being careful to install reverse correctly and the check balls and springs.
Those with questions regarding this procedure or other transmission/clutch related issues should post them in the "Transmission/Clutch/Axles" section. (edited to add new subsection of Metro Tech!)
Now, decide if you are going to work on the gears yourself or have a machinist do them.

Even if you are apprehensive, give the gears a try, GeoMetroForum is here to help!






Edited by pacapo, Apr 25 2018, 08:44 AM.
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billy508
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:gp WOW What a great post.. :thumb Thanks very very much for all the time and effort you put into this project. I am going to try and put it on a cd or a stick so I can keep it. One of the best "How to" I have seen. Thanks again. Mr Mullet Please pin this. :gp :drivin :drivin
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Johnny Mullet
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pacapo, I really appreciate you posting this! Great job!
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js112
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oh man!!! you are so cool
good DIY.!!!
:) :D
have learnt it
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duff_remle
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removed since pacapo IS 'phil n ed' on teamswift
Edited by duff_remle, Aug 14 2010, 12:58 PM.
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Murf 59
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Nice posting.
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Johnny Mullet
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duff_remle
Oct 2 2009, 11:04 AM
You should give credit to Phil N Ed or just link to his thread.
I was unaware :news

Credit given :deal

Phil N Ed is very helpful on TeamSwift :thumb
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mzprfkt
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Question on picture #5 You are removing the roll pin with a punch and sledge?? Does the roll pin stay on the punch? Help a blond out here :)
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mzprfkt
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Never mind....Im a dork!
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pacapo
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mzprfkt
Oct 23 2009, 01:45 PM
Question on picture #5 You are removing the roll pin with a punch and sledge?? Does the roll pin stay on the punch? Help a blond out here :)
The roll pin is 'punched through' and will not remain on the punch.
That's a fair question; therefore don't consider yourself a 'dork'.
You bring up a good point; try and use a punch with a diameter the same size as the roll pin's outer diameter, or a little bit less so that you don't end up spreading the pin, and making it harder to punch through.

Just a reminder, picture #5 is of an earlier model transmission than what you probably have.
Your transmission might be the second one that we did in the thread and starts with this picture:
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(...actually, it's a female doing the black box disassembly, so how tough can it be?)

There will be a nice write up on how to do the gears, but here's a write up from "Dr. Bill" in Washington State:

DIY Tranny Rebuild, Page 1
If you can't click on the link above, here's the address:
http://www.automotiveforums.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=941461

DIY Tranny Rebuild, Page 2
Again, here's the web page:
http://www.automotiveforums.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=944174


He isn't using a press, and is trying to show an inexpensive way to swap out bearings, etc.

If you do decide to rebuild your gearbox at home, pay close attention to Dr. Bill's pictures, especially the one showing how the hub (the smooth looking double ring affair below the quarter) is oriented in this picture:
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I believe he mentions that he borrowed this picture from another member, "Way".

Most people feel that using a shop press is safer and quicker, especially if you can pick one up used, or borrow a neighbor's.
I don't want to steal the thunder of the author of the next 'DIY' thread, so enough on that for now.

He does use a couple of techniques which cause him some pain, so plan on sitting for a half hour to read through his procedure before you decide which path to take.
Dr. Bill's thread should be commended especially on his cleanliness an his careful approach to the task.
Maybe I missed it, but it would have been nice if he'd mentioned his chemical brew for cleaning up those parts.


Quote:
 
You should give credit to Phil N Ed or just link to his thread.

FYI:
Phil N Ed on Teamswift is member #15 (by join date) on our GeoMetro Forum, so no need for credit. :thumb he just reposted it here so it would be easier for the members to look up.
He doesn't post much, as his Metro has no problems and changed his screen name on this Forum as his neighbor (Ed) moved years ago.
Thanks for the 'pump', the more of these cars we can keep on the road, the better.

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Murf 59
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That is a very nice shot of the gears. A press does make it a lot easier. And having the right bearing splitters, makes it really easy. And he is not kidding. Mark your hubs and sliders. They must goe back exactly the same way they came off.
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compjake
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:O this should be pinned!
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Memphis metro


While this is informative, I do not recommend the average person visiting this site to tear one of these down. It is one thing to tear something apart. It is quite another to locate the problems and make correct repairs and put it back together and it work. JMHO How many times I have been handed a box full of parts from someone and them wanting me to put it back together! This is not something a mechanic likes to see. Let him do the whole job if you cannot do it. Do to the complexities of transmissions this is why the average autorepair manuals like haynes do not give this information to the average do it yourselfer. On the other hand, if someone has a yard full of metros and some spare transmissions laying around and he wants to tear one down, good go for it, chances are you will learn a lot. Other wise if you depend on your metro and are not experienced in transmission repair you would be better off served getting a professional for this job. Its kinda like this, suppose my dad needed a heart bypass and someone showed me with pictures how to do it. Well theres no possible way they could tell me everything and the problems that could arise doing the operation and even though I had the pictures I would still be inadequate to perform the operation.














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Edited by Memphis metro, Aug 13 2010, 08:24 AM.
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pacapo
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enginedoctorgeo
Aug 13 2010, 07:52 AM
While this is informative, I do not recommend the average person visiting this site to tear one of these down. It is one thing to tear something apart. It is quite another to locate the problems and make correct repairs and put it back together and it work. JMHO How many times I have been handed a box full of parts from someone and them wanting me to put it back together! This is not something a mechanic likes to see. Let him do the whole job if you cannot do it. Do to the complexities of transmissions this is why the average autorepair manuals like haynes do not give this information to the average do it yourselfer. On the other hand, if someone has a yard full of metros and some spare transmissions laying around and he wants to tear one down, good go for it, chances are you will learn a lot. Other wise if you depend on your metro and are not experienced in transmission repair you would be better off served getting a professional for this job. Its kinda like this, suppose my dad needed a heart bypass and someone showed me with pictures how to do it. Well theres no possible way they could tell me everything and the problems that could arise doing the operation and even though I had the pictures I would still be inadequate to perform the operation.
For those of you who have taken the time to read this far down in the thread I'll summarize:
TWO transmission cases have been split for you (above).
One by a man, one by a 100 pound WOMAN. (Take a closer look at this picture)
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Neither case was split by me; I simply took the pictures.
NO special tools were used.
NO above average skills were needed.

If you can understand my post of March 20th
http://geometroforum.com/topic/3016184/1/?x=90#post247132
then you have the basic comprehension skills necessary to split the case, and don't let anyone prevent you from attempting this!
Knowledge is to be shared; this site and this thread are complimentary in that they are both POSITIVE attempts to get you to repair your own vehicles, saving you money in these difficult economic times.
The 'open heart surgery' example above is NOT an equivalent comparison. In surgery, you rotate from student to teacher via years of study, going from third assist to second assist to first assist to head surgeon. People, likewise have transposed organs, different blood types and many many other variables which require the gradual progression.
These transmissions are ALL the same. What you see in the pictures above (aside from carnage) is what you will see when you take yours apart. THIS IS NOT (AND I REPEAT, NOT) OPEN HEART SURGERY!!! I wouldn't even rank it as high as a C-section, and I've done many of those...but I digress.
Splitting a case is MUCH EASIER than surgery and I have confidence that even the most average amongst us can do this.
We're supposed to be Amer "I CAN" and what happened to the CAN DO attitude that made the USA great?
All the pictures are great, not just the picture I borrowed with Way's permission and the good 'Doctor Bill' was so kind enough to label with PART NUMBERS!
So you young fellows with NO experience at all, try this on an old transmission. See if I'm right or wrong.
The thread I linked to above in this post is an example of a couple of guys who used this technique and fixed their transmission WITHOUT tearing into the input or counter shafts.
Once again, let's keep the 'witch hunts' to a minimum.

Having said that, let's move this thread along.

Once in a while you will come across threads asking how to determine final drive ratios and differences in differentials. I've given you a link in this post (above) how you can EASILY tell different gear ratios, but what about the differential differences? (Now there's a mouthful!)
This is a bit of information which may be useful for some of you attempting to build one of the earlier boxes (the top transmission at the beginning of the thread is an earlier transmission...'85-'88). If you come across one of those in the junkyard and want to know if it's worth anything look for these two things:
First check and see if it has the black bracket indicated by the red arrow:
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If so, you'll have to check inside where the axle goes.
Look and see if it has the extra set of pins which 'approximate' (get close to) the main pin running through the spider gears. Sorry for the picture, but it's the best I could do in early morning light. You're looking for the end of those two pins indicated by the white arrow:
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These two pictures are an attempt to show the difference between a regular transaxle and a 'Turbo' transaxle, and those of you who rely on the FSM for your information will recall that the earlier Turbo trans has these pins for added strength.


Keep a couple of things in mind:
-this is a long thread with lots of pictures because: we split the case TWICE before your eyes!
-you are not average; using this site to fix anything on your car is a commendable way to conduct yourselves!





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Memphis metro


Just to split the case as you say sure anyone can do that. My fourteen year old son can do that. To make a accurate rebuild and repair that works that is something more than splitting the case! I have my point of view and you have yours. No witch hunt here. Just my plain point of view. And let it be noted that I give my point of view on many threads and not just yours. Another reason to point to it not being a witch hunt. Yes this is the USA and people can and do things if they can. Sometimes it will cost you a lot of money in the long run where as if you had paid the professional to do it would have saved you time money and trouble. It is not always best to tackle things yourself. Sometimes yes, always no. Dont get me wrong, I am all for this thread and admit it is informative. I just dont believe rebuilding a transmission is for everyone.











.
Edited by Memphis metro, Aug 13 2010, 10:20 AM.
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pacapo
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enginedoctorgeo
Aug 13 2010, 10:05 AM
Just to split the case as you say sure anyone can do that. My fourteen year old son can do that. To make a accurate rebuild and repair that works that is something more than splitting the case! I have my point of view and you have yours. No witch hunt here. Just my plain point of view. And let it be noted that I give my point of view on many threads and not just yours. Another reason to point to it not being a witch hunt. Yes this is the USA and people can and do things if they can. Sometimes it will cost you a lot of money in the long run where as if you had paid the professional to do it would have saved you time money and trouble. It is not always best to tackle things yourself. Sometimes yes, always no. Dont get me wrong, I am all for this thread and admit it is informative. I just dont believe rebuilding a transmission is for everyone.
This thread began:
Quote:
 
Many people concentrate on their engines, and few work on their transmissions.
This thread will help you overcome the "fear of the unknown" and become one of 'the few'.

...which includes our member's belief that rebuilding a transmission shouldn't be rebuilt by everyone.
Indeed, read the TITLE of the thread it is NOT "How to rebuild a transmission" but rather
DIY Transmission Repair - Splitting the Case
and is a sequel to Johnny Mullet's transmission removal guide.
Dr. Bill has already done a wonderful thread on another site, credit has been given to him regarding that part of the transmission rebuild guide, and perhaps there is no need to add to his thread. Getting personal:
Whether my 13 year old daughter can split the case faster than your 14 year old son, or my 31 year old daughter can shift gears :drivin faster than me in a Peterbilt is not the issue...this is not about speed. One member has mentioned this shouldn't be attempted by everyone, but does say that even his 14 year old son could do this. I'm not sure whether to congratulate his son or chastise the rest of you...or both! :hmm
We've only got ONE Metro, that's not the issue. People who attempt this need not even have a car; it can be an exercise in a High School classroom, for example.
What was said:
It is not always best to tackle things yourself. Sometimes yes, always no.
Does not apply in this thread and is the issue. This thread is about helping people OVERCOME their aversion/fear of working on a STANDARD transmission. Someone with basic curiosity and standard hand tools can pull apart their transmission and one from the junkyard in no time at all. Swapping in good parts for bad parts is the natural 'flow' of this thread. Although that is what a 'professional' does daily, there is a certain self-satisfaction which comes from driving a car in which YOU rebuilt the transmission. This thread is directed to people like that, not people looking for problems (witch hunters) but people trying to solve problems on a limited budget.
Enough of this naysaying.
We began by saying this might be a little overwhelming.
If you think this is tough...sure...don't try something MORE complicated, like an automatic.
But if you follow what's written, step by step; take your time...(I agree, let's bring the kids into this) even your teenager can do this. If you run into problems, you can always post in the appropriate section of this site. And don't be afraid of taking a transmission to a reputable transmission shop in a basket. Professionals who do this for a living will not have a problem putting everything back in order no matter how many pieces you give them, and if they seem alarmed at receiving a tranny in pieces, I suggest you find another shop!

Those of you who 'can' kindly post some helpful information so that the 'newbie' and 'lurker' on this site can work up enough courage to split his or her case!
Apologies in advance for any misspellings or grammatical errors, but regarding the TECHNICAL part of this thread:
There have been some suggestions from other Continents to make this process easier, and hopefully I've included them in the second case 'split'(black box/Metro).

Are there any other helpful additions and/or corrections?




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Memphis metro


Why would someone want to split a case if they are not attempting to repair or rebuild a transmission? The average untrained eye cannot spot detail malfuntions. Anyway I will back out now, I have made the point I wanted to make with the very first post I made. I sure did not intend to get into a long drawn out ordeal. I do apologize if I come off as negative. I do not intend to belittle anyone but some times I do offer a differant perspective on things.








.












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Edited by Memphis metro, Aug 13 2010, 01:32 PM.
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compjake
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Looks like I may have opened a can of worms lol, sorry pacapo :P
Edited by compjake, Aug 13 2010, 01:28 PM.
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pacapo
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compjake
Aug 13 2010, 01:28 PM
Looks like I may have opened a can of worms lol, sorry pacapo :P
:oshit :oshit :oshit
Quote:
 
The average untrained eye cannot spot detail malfuntions.
That's great, but again...doesn't apply to this thread.
Now it's MY turn to give an opinion.
If your 7 year old daughter can look at a gear and say, "Gee, Dad...that gear looks worn!",
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or, "Gee Dad, those gears looked chipped!"
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so can you. There is no mysterious secret to finding bad gears; there is no 'expert eye' needed.
If your transmission is making noise and you can hear it inside the car, no DETAIL MALFUNCTIONS are occurring-you've got full-blown gear or bearing problems visible to the NAKED :evillol :evillol :evillol :evillol EYE audible to the naked ear!
You may not like my opinion, but here's some more of it:
The reason you split a case is to find out what's wrong or find out what makes it tick, NOT fix it!
(When you put it back TOGETHER, THAT'S when you'll fix it or upgrade it, eh?)
:news :news :news :news :news
MORE of my opinion:
I think GeoMetroForum is a GREAT site for people of ALL experience levels to visit, whether they wish to work on their engines, transmissions, interiors, and/or exteriors. We joined RIGHT AWAY to be a POSITIVE FORCE for good on this site, providing what little information we can to help those who wish to help themselves.
Sorry to be blunt, but I don't know any way to 'sugar coat' it.

Compjake, thanks for the props, no need to apologize; it's people like you who make GMF a GREAT site. Indeed, the guy who can be seen splitting the first transmission in the thread drove down from Oregon and did it just as a learning experience - not to repair a transmission. Call it bragging rights, if you will...or part of his 'bucket list'.
I promised the fellows on Teamswift about a year before I made that thread, and I reposted it here to save the members here the trouble of having to look for it. Both sites are great, especially when you ACCENTUATE the positive.
Sometime between when I promised to make this thread and when I actually did it, Dr. Bob posted his transmission rebuild thread, and Knuckles on Teamswift read his 'How To' and posted the link which complements this thread.
You're right, this should be pinned, for although engine work is important, it's not the full story. You have to be able to get the power to the wheels! This thread in conjunction with the FSM should be more than enough to help most DIY'ers who wish to rebuild their own boxes.
Since Johnny Mullet's 'How to Remove your Transmission' thread is pinned, and this thread is linked towards the end of his thread, I guess it is pinned, in a way.
You haven't opened a can of worms, but in the old days, that's exactly what we would say when we split a case!
:thumb :thumb
Best regards!
:) :) :) :)
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Memphis metro


Question. Have you had any trouble running down new replacement gears? Where did you get them? Or have you been using used gears? I used to rebuild a lot of transfer cases in fuel tanker trucks and the cases were old hale units and it was a major deal finding used gears and completely impossible to find new ones.










.
Edited by Memphis metro, Aug 15 2010, 08:37 PM.
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Johnny Mullet
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Synchros are now becoming hard to find.
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1DCGUY
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Johnny Mullet
Aug 15 2010, 08:38 PM
Synchros are now becoming hard to find.
Any chance you purchased one of those sets on Ebay, and if you did, how did it work? :hmm
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Memphis metro


I dont know if this will help anyone but I will tack it on here anyway,

http://www.gmpartsgiant.com/components/1993-chevrolet-metro~speed-manual-transaxle-gears-su040970104-l72m581ms08.html
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pacapo
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MetroRob asked a question about this part:
Posted Image
And I'd like to update this thread as a result.
That part is mentioned in step 12 of this thread and I'll repeat it:
Posted Image
(12. Remove the roll pin using the correct diameter drift/punch)
That is the procedure for the earlier model transmission (pre-'89).
The second transmission (above) is a later model 'black box' and several differences were noted.
One difference I neglected to mention :banghead is the double roll pin in the later transmission.
It was replaced by a bolt. The bolt is much easier to remove than the double roll pin, so I consider it an 'upgrade'.
This DIY 'Split the Case' thread was an attempt to produce something which could be used in conjunction with the Factory Service Manual. The idea was to make a guide which was plain and simple, covering not only disassembly, but reassembly. During the scheduling of these photos, Dr. Bill came out with his internal rebuild thread, so there has been less pressure to get the last half of this 'Rebuilding Your Transmission' thread finished. With the advent of Vimeo and inexpensive High Definition cameras, we may just do a complete guide with video, so that the youngest amongst us can read, view and watch the action as a transmission comes apart and goes back together.

My comments to the membership may not be what you want to hear all the time, but the information I relay is correct to the best of my knowledge. You may get 'rubbed the wrong way' when I tell you about emissions systems and why they are important to the running of your car. This thread, however, is designed as a more detailed 'study chapter' which can stand alone as written to help you fix your transmission. Indeed, other members here (GMF) have taken this information and written a nice DIY thread splitting the case, taking internals from another junkyard transmission, and putting it back together.

If you are 'tech certified', I applaud your time in helping those less experienced or less 'product specific' experienced. However, I also hold you to a higher standard. You should not be discouraging people from attempting to repair their vehicles properly; rather you should support their efforts! In addition, I would never expect a 'tech certified' individual to suggest means whereby an owner could circumvent his emissions systems, and should I see that, I would consider that a most unethical behavior, unfitting to a respectable member of this Forum.

Back on topic, this post is an update/addition/correction to #12 of the EARLY transmission as it applies to the BLACK BOX transmissions found on the Metro.
MetroRob (or any other member), can you confirm the information that I have just posted? (Does your transmission use a double roll pin or a bolt to fix that 'shift rod coupler'?
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billy508
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billy508

Professionals who do this for a living will not have a problem putting everything back in order no matter how many pieces you give them, and if they seem alarmed at receiving a tranny in pieces, I suggest you find another shop.! Very good point. That is exactly what I tell someone who brings me a basket case. [ Find another shop. Missing parts, damage from being improperly disassembled can make repair a difficult task. You have presented a great guide that will help many people. I applaud you for your time and effort to shed light on a complex repair. However it might be prudent for a person contemplating such a repair to call a shop in advance and ask them "If I take my Geo Metro 5 speed transmission apart and have trouble, can I just bring you all the pieces and have you put it back together for me?" :banana :banana :banana
Edited by billy508, Feb 3 2011, 11:28 AM.
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Spock
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Live Long and Prosper.

PACAPO,

Mine is the later 'black box' model and uses the bolt instead of the roll pin. The transmission is out of a 2000 3cylinder.

As a point, I noticed that there are numbers stamped into the transmission as I was doing my rebuild. I wonder if there is a way to reference these numbers somewhere to know what model (or ratio) transmission you have.
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Memphis metro


billy508
Feb 3 2011, 06:11 AM
Professionals who do this for a living will not have a problem putting everything back in order no matter how many pieces you give them, and if they seem alarmed at receiving a tranny in pieces, I suggest you find another shop.! Very good point. That is exactly what I tell someone who brings me a basket case. [ Find another shop. Missing parts, damage from being improperly disassembled can make repair a difficult task. You have presented a great guide that will help many people. I applaud you for your time and effort to shed light on a complex repair. It might be prudent for a person contemplating such a repair to call a shop in advance and ask them "If I take my Geo Metro 5 speed transmission apart and have trouble, can I just bring you all the pieces and have you put it back together for me?" :banana :banana :banana
True billy, they can put them back together but never the less they do not like to receive them in pieces in a box. They had much rather tear them down themselves and go from there.
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Murf 59
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I made a lot of money off do it your selfers. Some shops will do basket cases. Others won't touch them. Just be prepared to pay a few more $. And do not loose any parts.
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metroschultz
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Please just call me; "Schultz"

true dat
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pacapo
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Are you experienced?
[ *  *  *  * ]
MetroRob
Feb 3 2011, 09:05 AM
PACAPO,

Mine is the later 'black box' model and uses the bolt instead of the roll pin. The transmission is out of a 2000 3cylinder.

As a point, I noticed that there are numbers stamped into the transmission as I was doing my rebuild. I wonder if there is a way to reference these numbers somewhere to know what model (or ratio) transmission you have.
MetroRob, as far as I know, there is no easy way to tell your final gear ratio using the serial numbers on the outside of the transmission. There are several ways to find out without splitting the case. Bad Bent has referenced my easy way without opening any part of the transmission; a wise man can determine his gear ratio using that technique, or he can try to count the ring and pinion gears. So far, no one has come up with an easier way, and no one has completed the information that I mentioned. :hmm

Now, a paragraph to the posters who have a different 'opinion' than me about splitting the case:
Although I haven't seen any of their transmissions apart (apologies if there are previous posts by them with transmission internals posted), and they haven't added anything POSITIVE to the thread (improvements in technique, etc.) you might feel more comfortable handing your transmission in a basket to someone who knows what they are doing, and not someone who belittles you for cutting down their work load.
Let me put it another way. If you took a V-8 engine all apart and gave it to JM, I doubt he'd blink an eye, but just get busy making it work again, after all - "Who's afraid of a V-8"? :ermm: When you run into people who have a high opinion of themselves but balk at putting together your 'basket case' tranny, I'd run the other way. A true professional will be able to fix your box no matter whether you split the case or they. Following the procedure above, I can't see how you'd damage parts. And of course, if you are smart enough to follow this tutorial, I'll bet you won't lose any parts, either!
As has been mentioned, ask your local shop in advance. Busy shops have a series of prices, depending on the work you want done (split the case/synchros&gears/reassembly). People who do this for a living may even give you a discount if you 'split the case' for them, so if you are not independently wealthy, pay attention. I have credited a shop in Los Angeles which does just that on Teamswift. Never do business with a 'fussy butt' who gets all emotional when you hand him a Metro transmission in a box ^o) as his lack of product knowledge is showing through! If you don't think that someone should split their tranny case, by all means, start a thread on why NOT! (Sorry, it was an issue which needed addressing.)

Thus far, the only 'special tool' I used was a hand impact driver (step #10 pictured above).
I've even included some SAE wrenches to add a little 'flavor' to the thread.
There has been some talk about 'sacrilege' for linking to Dr. Bill's tutorial, as it is on another web site.
If that becomes a problem, perhaps we will continue this thread and split the gears off each shaft so that all the information will be in one thread...unless one of our hot air boxes decides to show us how it's done :popcorn

Using just the information in this thread you can take transmissions apart, switch internals, and be back on the road in a matter of hours.
This knowledge is to be shared and I have attempted no 'copyright' or stuck my name all over the images. You do what you can with this info, no lawyer will come after you and no need to give anyone but yourself the credit! It is simply a pictorial that follows the FSM (Factory Service Manual).
The intent of this humble thread was to help you overcome your fear of the tranny (from one DIY'er to another); and it appears to have met its mark!
To the many who have messaged me with thanks, I appreciate your feedback;
:cheers


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pacapo
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[ *  *  *  * ]
Once you have followed this 25 step (roughly 30 minutes actual work time) tutorial, you will have the transmission case split into two halves and will have 3 shafts to inspect:
-reverse
-input shaft
-counter rotating shaft (counter shaft)

To continue, you should read this thread:
http://geometroforum.com/topic/4170394/1/
which picks up where this thread leaves 'off' and will discuss in detail (with pictures) how to disassemble and assemble the input and counter shafts, and reassemble the transmission. Take special note of the procedure he includes that most people neglect: changing the shift bushing in the right case. It should be changed with every rebuild to prevent leaks. The accordion boot which you can see from the outside of the transmission is only a dust boot; don't expect it to hold back any oil.
You will need special tools and must work carefully. That is why the transmission pros get the 'big bucks' to do a transmission rebuild. If you do NOT have the special tools mentioned and pictured, relax. You can still take your shafts to any reputable machine shop with the new rebuild parts and they can change them for you. This will save you a tremendous amount of money as well.
A person with an interest in machinery (a machinist) should be happy to press the parts apart and together for you.
He should consider it similar to 'reading a new book' or watching a new television show.
If he's a grumbly sort, move on to a real machinist who will help you and enjoy the challenge (think "Mr Bill").

A special thanks to our new member 95-3banger for his time and effort.
:cheers
It has been a long time coming.



Happy motoring!
^o)
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cdmccul
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I wish I had seen this thread a long time ago - I had a spare transmission sitting on the ground in my garage when I moved, and would have really loved to have kept it. The case had debris in it from sitting around, and needed taken apart and cleaned up - this thread would have let me do JUST that. I also could have seen if it would have been a lost cause to even re-assemble. I would have brought it to my new house if I had seen this thread. Oh well, TOO late now!

Thanks for all the effort into making this thread possible!
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xfi boy
Fresh Fish
[ * ]
is there any difference between rebuilding the XFI tranny and a regular geo metro 5spd trans. i kno that the gears are different but is their anything else?
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Woodie
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There is no difference. As long as you don't go counting teeth, you'll never know.
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johannes
New Member
[ *  * ]
I'm stuck on step 13. I do not get it. :banghead
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David95237


No step 13 on the metro trans, look further down the page.
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geoguyxfi
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Posted Image
my transmission did not seperate like that the diff and gears came out with other half of housing. im following your teardown so i was hoping you could shine a light into keeping me in write direction to get gear shafts out. thanks in advance and what happend to friday night chat?
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Dattman
Express Shopper

Photo 17 is your problem, do NOT remove the 3 detent balls and springs until after you have split the case, this keeps the gears and shafts in the bell housing part of the case.
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Matamangus
Fresh Fish
[ * ]
What the heck happened to all the pictures?
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1DCGUY
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Don't be a "Richard"

Matamangus
Sep 19 2017, 10:07 PM
What the heck happened to all the pictures?
Photobucket started charging to host pictures, and blocked many accounts.

Which Rochester are you from? New York, or Minnesota?
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Aaron R.
Fresh Fish
[ * ]
I'm getting ready to rebuild a 5 speed for the first time and pictures or a manual would be very helpful. Anybody got a file with all the pics and instructions, or recommendations on this?
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freegeo
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The factory service manual has a transmission section in it. There is a copy of it here on the forum. Here is a link to it. Look in section - 07B1 MANUAL TRANSAXLE UNIT REPAIR

http://geometroforum.com/topic/5044844/1/#new
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God ozzie
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Great post. Not very helpful without pictures though..
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Metromightymouse
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Powdercoat Wizard

God ozzie
Mar 15 2018, 10:31 AM
Great post. Not very helpful without pictures though..
There are browser extensions that fix that issue. Find the photobucket thread and it has them listed there.
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pacapo
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Are you experienced?
[ *  *  *  * ]
If you are using Google Chrome, try this:


https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/photobucket-embedded-imag/ogipgokcopooepeipngiikdkpmcpkaon?hl=en-US


Photobucket Embedded Image Fix
chrome.google.com
This extension fixes nuked Photobucket pictures.



Click 'add to chrome'. It worked for me.

There are 2 extensions. One works.
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nwgeo


Memphis metro
Aug 13 2010, 10:05 AM
Just to split the case as you say sure anyone can do that. My fourteen year old son can do that. To make a accurate rebuild and repair that works that is something more than splitting the case! I have my point of view and you have yours. No witch hunt here. Just my plain point of view. And let it be noted that I give my point of view on many threads and not just yours. Another reason to point to it not being a witch hunt. Yes this is the USA and people can and do things if they can. Sometimes it will cost you a lot of money in the long run where as if you had paid the professional to do it would have saved you time money and trouble. It is not always best to tackle things yourself. Sometimes yes, always no. Dont get me wrong, I am all for this thread and admit it is informative. I just dont believe rebuilding a transmission is for everyone.











.
Love these picture how to's. I have tackled many car projects on my own for the 1st time... sometimes I have broken things and that has cost me time and $s.

I will no longer take any of my cars to a "professional" Through the years they have charged me big $s and made things worse or no better.

My worst experience was with a transmission. I had very little money in those days but had scraped to buy the car the family needed. About a year later the transmission went out. I had little money but less time as my better half wanted her family car back. Found the best transmission shop in town I thought took the car in $2500 later I had the car, the trans lasted less than a year and the shop only warranted their work for 6 months. The shop accused me of being hard on the transmission, if anything I was supper easy on it and the wife too.

I took the pan off and the tech had stripped the bolts to the pan and the fluid was supper dirty.

I had even less $s now and went to PnP. Removed a trans and installed my self in my car, changed the fluid. That used transmission that I put in has over 100k miles on it now and is still going.

That is just one story. There are more... another time.

I will say I have met honest hard working carful mechanics...but those doing it as fast as humanly possible and less that straight with you...not good---I would rather do the work myself.
Edited by nwgeo, Jun 19 2018, 01:15 PM.
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Fogger
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ScienceGeek

pacapo
Feb 3 2011, 01:05 AM
MetroRob asked a question about this part:
Posted Image
And I'd like to update this thread as a result.
That part is mentioned in step 12 of this thread and I'll repeat it:
I believe a word of warning is in order here about this yoke. I was following the steps from this post AND the FSM (which has multiple errors - but that's another issue) to swap out the differential assembly in my 97.
Upon reassembly, I had not made any mental notes, nor any others about which way this part slides onto the shift selector shaft. I had a 50/50 chance of getting it right. Anyway, now I know why I don't like to gamble...
The unit will not shift properly with this part installed 180 degrees reversed, as I found out when I tried to lock the shafts to torque down the countershaft nut.
Anyway, I believe it bears mentioning here to make sure you see which way it is installed prior to removal. I had spent a few days trying to get the bearings off the diff and forgot which way it went by the time I started reassembling the unit.
Take a picture - draw a picture - make a note - because the FSM says absolutely nothing about this, and for someone who is trying this for the first time, that would have been quite helpful.
Just thought someone could learn from my mistake.
Hope this helps!
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nwgeo


Excellent reminder.
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Woodie
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Fogger
Jun 19 2018, 12:56 PM
I had a 50/50 chance of getting it right. Anyway, now I know why I don't like to gamble...
Agreed

When faced with a 50/50 probability, I seem to take the wrong decision about 75% of the time. :smackface
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