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Air conditioning chart..
Topic Started: Jul 10 2018, 05:48 PM (214 Views)
Mrbreeze


I been doing some sluthing, and I came across a "chart" that I keep hearing about, it's got #'s and temps, and stuff I don't understand, care to enlighten us?
Edited by Mrbreeze, Jul 10 2018, 05:49 PM.
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geogonfa
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Post a link to the chart...
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freegeo
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Is it ones that look similar to this?

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Attached to this post:
Attachments: Ac_chart_1.jpg (89.25 KB)
Edited by freegeo, Jul 11 2018, 08:04 AM.
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freegeo
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This is the thread.

http://geometroforum.com/topic/4441181/1/#new

This is the chart.

http://geometroforum.com/single/?p=518067&t=4441181
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Mrbreeze


Yes, I don't know how to even find the thread information, thank you freegeo..
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freegeo
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I don't know much about the AC system but that chart looks like it would kinda hard to follow.
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Scoobs
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:D

Short version of an explanation, is ambient temp effects the amount of actual pressure readings from your a/c manifold gauges. Aswell as a/c condenser tempatures. Higher the temp, the higher the pressure readings on both low side and high sides.
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Woodie
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Wouldn't that chart be drastically different for different coolants?
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Scoobs
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:D

Woodie
Jul 12 2018, 05:03 AM
Wouldn't that chart be drastically different for different coolants?
I dont really think it would be very much different, R12 ran at a slightly lower pressure, and that was only used up until about 94-95? Most have converted already to 134a where the chart works as its designed. R1234yf however will not even come close to working in our metros, but the new cars that use it, about 3oz is the most the system will hold, vs metros @18oz of 134a, and i think it was 12 or 15oz on R12. That r1234yf should have never been made, its flammable, and highly corrosive to glass.
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Dystopiate666
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Tree Banger

Its a little easier for me to just look at the numbers. I like this chart.

http://acprocold.com/faq/r-134a-system-pressure-chart/
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Woodie
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That is much nicer.
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92MHB
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Scoobs
Jul 12 2018, 11:39 PM
Woodie
Jul 12 2018, 05:03 AM
Wouldn't that chart be drastically different for different coolants?
I dont really think it would be very much different, R12 ran at a slightly lower pressure, and that was only used up until about 94-95? Most have converted already to 134a where the chart works as its designed. R1234yf however will not even come close to working in our metros, but the new cars that use it, about 3oz is the most the system will hold, vs metros @18oz of 134a, and i think it was 12 or 15oz on R12. That r1234yf should have never been made, its flammable, and highly corrosive to glass.
actually mine is still r12-- engine sticker says min .99lbs, max is 1.21 pounds--so 15.84oz-19.36oz capacity
I wish I could fine a temp vs pressure chart for the R12

the gauges on the manifold are supposed to have the pressures vs temps fo R12, R22, R134a and R502, but I'm not sure if it's just the "Chinese conversion factors" or what but my set of gauges are not correct --1st off you have to convert C to F, but then the low pressure gauge numbers are not correct (the High pressure side seems correct though)--if I use 90 degrees F, convert to C, that equals 32 Deg C--but my Low pressure side says for R12 the pressure should be 90psi at 32 C---I know thats not right--guess thats what you get for buying a cheepo manifold set made in china off of ebay
Edited by 92MHB, Jul 13 2018, 12:00 PM.
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blue_can
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92MHB
Jul 13 2018, 11:51 AM
Scoobs
Jul 12 2018, 11:39 PM
Woodie
Jul 12 2018, 05:03 AM
Wouldn't that chart be drastically different for different coolants?
I dont really think it would be very much different, R12 ran at a slightly lower pressure, and that was only used up until about 94-95? Most have converted already to 134a where the chart works as its designed. R1234yf however will not even come close to working in our metros, but the new cars that use it, about 3oz is the most the system will hold, vs metros @18oz of 134a, and i think it was 12 or 15oz on R12. That r1234yf should have never been made, its flammable, and highly corrosive to glass.
actually mine is still r12-- engine sticker says min .99lbs, max is 1.21 pounds--so 15.84oz-19.36oz capacity
I wish I could fine a temp vs pressure chart for the R12

the gauges on the manifold are supposed to have the pressures vs temps fo R12, R22, R134a and R502, but I'm not sure if it's just the "Chinese conversion factors" or what but my set of gauges are not correct --1st off you have to convert C to F, but then the low pressure gauge numbers are not correct (the High pressure side seems correct though)--if I use 90 degrees F, convert to C, that equals 32 Deg C--but my Low pressure side says for R12 the pressure should be 90psi at 32 C---I know thats not right--guess thats what you get for buying a cheepo manifold set made in china off of ebay
The temperatures shown on the gauges are the saturation temperatures of the refrigerant - this is the same information you will see on a P-T chart for the refrigerant. All it tells you is the temperature within the core of the condenser or evaporator when the system is operating and stable.

Translating that to a ambient or discharge temperature is very much dependent on the system design - coil design, airflow speed etc. It is better use a manufacturer specific chart if available like the one posted.
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